April 2018

I loved breastfeeding! It was such an emotional and bonding experience between me and my son, and it came so much more natural to me than I had ever imagined before becoming a mother. Sure, it was complicated to get started properly because of soreness and getting the flow right and the joy of mastitis hit me a couple of times in the beginning. Also, because of my injured tailbone I could only breastfeed when I was lying down, which made it all quite inconvenient. But for the relationship with my son I absolutely loved it – and so did he!

So when I was told that the prolapse might see an improvement when I stopped breastfeeding I stood in front of a difficult decision. I was back on that battle where the personal me wanted to try everything to get my own body back to some sort of normality… but as a mother I really didn’t want to stop breastfeeding! The discussion came up every time I went for a ’prolapse checkup’ and I came from the appointment confused and a little sad. When to stop breastfeeding was not a decision I wanted to make in this way. I wanted to be able to continue as long as my little one needed/wanted it without having any other reason making me decide to stop. And on top of it, I didn’t know that stopping would for sure help, it was just a ’might’. I guess it was also for that reason that each time the question came up, I ended up putting it behind me, and I let the mother win this battle.

I therefore continued breastfeeding with no consideration of the prolapse and stopped when my son was 17 months old. I saw no significant difference in the prolapse symptoms after. And I feel very pleased that I listened to my heart on this one.

But what are your experiences? I am not sure if this breastfeeding thing is something scientifially proven or not. But I believe it is due to hormonal reasons – something about that the estrogen levels are lower when you breastfeed making the vaginal tissues weaker, so when you stop and your cycle and estrogen levels are back to normal it may have a positive effect on the tissues and pelvic floor strength – but please do not quote me on this. I am in fact very curious about hearing YOUR experiences on the topic?! Has anyone had a prolapse improvement after stopping breastfeeding? Or do you have any other thoughts (or knowledge!) on this? Please share!

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Before having children I think I imagined that I would want my second one about 2 years after the first. Then, that seemed reasonable to me.

Once I was a mother and I knew the toll the pregnancy and birth had taken on my body the months soon became a year and more and I was still not ready to have another baby. Maybe it was the physiotherapist’s word ringing in the back of my mind: ‘Ideally give your body two years of rest post-partum before getting pregnant again’. Like that I would give my body a chance to naturally heal up from the pregnancy and birth and go into another one as strong as possible.

But sometimes I played with the thought of having a second one sooner. Maybe I should think the opposite way instead? What I mean is: going for the next child closer to the first and ‘get it over with’ and then take care of my body damage and potential treatment options afterwards? Because no matter what, I seemed to understand that if I wanted to go down a surgical route for the prolapse then I would have to have all the children I want before. The reason being that there might be no point in doing surgery to correct things when another pregnancy might just mess it up and it needs to be redone anyway. So maybe, if I instead I have all the children I plan to have in a shorter amount of time and then deal with the problems afterwards – at least  that would mean less years passing by in total, I would just decrease the recovery between each pregnancy. And I could sooner focus on getting my body back and hopefully become a runner again?! To be honest, the sensible part of me never really thought this seemed like the way to do things, but I have to admit it sometimes was an intriguing thought.

When I asked the women’s health gynaecology nurse about the matter she said she would rather recommend me to do the running I wish to do Now, before getting pregnant again. To try to reach a few goals now that I was ‘anyway back to running a little bit’. She is such a sweet person and I know she always tries her best but unfortunately she has no understanding of that the running I have managed to do so far postpartum is nowhere near any goals I would actually be happy to set. And even worse, I knew what she was trying to say between the lines….

Another pregnancy and birth might just make things so much worse and I won’t have the chance at all later on…

 

 

 

 

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